I Spent Most of a Year at YWAM Mazatlan

.

Base life is always lively. These 18 to 25 year olds keep me young.
There are times when things get very lively, when I have to tell myself
"This is YOUTH with a Mission, and and you came to help them, so enjoy the liveliness".
.

.




.

On Thursdays, I go with others in my church, "Vinyard Church", to feed the needy, especially at the dump.
The first hour is spent making up 300 sandwiches and cold drinks. The next two hours we distribute them.
.




Now About The Project I Came For
The Project was to add two floors to the existing hotel, and totally update the elecrical and plumbing.


.
.
In Mexico, construction goes heavy on labor, since they only have to pay a few dollars an hour.
Cranes cost a lot more than labor, so all the 1000 lb beams were handled by hand.
Notice the two chain hoists; also the human counterbalance for the scaffolding.
.
This same picture went on for months. You simply cannot  get in a hurry in Mexico.

The new $12,000, 500 KVA transformer did rate a hoist
.

When we needed skilled labor, it was "Mission Builders": volunteers from the US.
They were a huge help.
.

.
Many of the Mission Builders were Amish from Pennsilvania
...
We installed 60 Tons of Air Conditioning, and over 200 kilowatts of Water Heaters
.
The project is not complete, but is beginning to look very nice.
.
Look at that view out of the Worship Center
..

Another aspect of the base is a Mercy Ship.
YWAM has a lot of them. They go out as soon as possible after major disasters and bring help.
Our ship will have building tools, materials, medical facilities, and a staff to make use of them.
YWAM Mazatlan is getting their Mercy Ship ready for service.



.

.